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Publications of year 1998
Articles in journal, book chapters
  1. C. Varela and G. Agha. What after Java? From Objects to Actors. Computer Networks and ISDN Systems: The International J. of Computer Telecommunications and Networking, 30:573-577, April 1998. Note: Proceedings of the Seventh International Conference on The World Wide Web (WWW7), Brisbane, Australia. Keyword(s): concurrent programming, internet programming languages.
    Abstract:
    In this paper, we discuss some drawbacks of the Java programming language, and propose some potential improvements for concurrent object-oriented software development. In particular, we argue that Java's passive object model does not provide an effective means for building distributed applications, critical for the future of Web-based next-generation information systems. Specifically, we suggest improvements to Java's existing mechanisms for maintaining consistency across multiple threads (e.g. synchronized), sending asynchronous messages (e.g. start/run methods) and controlling resources (e.g. thread scheduling). We drive the discussion with examples and suggestions from our own work on the Actor model of computation.

    @article{varela-agha-www7-98,
    author = "C. Varela and G. Agha",
    title = {{What after Java? From Objects to Actors}},
    journal = "Computer Networks and ISDN Systems: The International J. of Computer Telecommunications and Networking",
    volume = "30",
    month = "April",
    year = "1998",
    pages = "573-577",
    note = "Proceedings of the Seventh International Conference on The World Wide Web (WWW7), Brisbane, Australia",
    url = "http://web.archive.org/web/20010404065326/http://osl.cs.uiuc.edu/Papers/www7/",
    keywords = "concurrent programming, internet programming languages",
    abstract = {In this paper, we discuss some drawbacks of the Java programming language, and propose some potential improvements for concurrent object-oriented software development. In particular, we argue that Java's passive object model does not provide an effective means for building distributed applications, critical for the future of Web-based next-generation information systems. Specifically, we suggest improvements to Java's existing mechanisms for maintaining consistency across multiple threads (e.g. synchronized), sending asynchronous messages (e.g. start/run methods) and controlling resources (e.g. thread scheduling). We drive the discussion with examples and suggestions from our own work on the Actor model of computation.} 
    }
    


Conference articles
  1. G. Agha, M. Astley, J. Sheikh, and C. A. Varela. Modular Heterogeneous System Development: A Critical Analysis of Java. In J. Antonio, editor, Proceedings of the Seventh Heterogeneous Computing Workshop (HCW '98), pages 144-155, March 1998. IEEE Computer Society. Keyword(s): distributed computing, internet programming languages, concurrent programming, coordination models.
    Abstract:
    Java supports heterogeneous applications by transforming a heterogeneous network of machines into a homogeneous network of Java virtual machines. This approach abstracts over many of the complications that arise from heterogeneity, providing a uniform API to all components of an application. However, for many applications heterogeneity is an intentional feature where components and resources are co-located for optimal performance. The authors argue that Java's API does not provide an effective means for building applications in such an environment. Specifically, they suggest improvements to Java's existing mechanisms for maintaining consistency (e.g. synchronized), and controlling resources (e.g. thread scheduling). They also consider the recent addition of a CORBA API in JDK 1.2. They argue that while such an approach provides greater flexibility for heterogeneous applications, many key problems still exist from an architectural standpoint. Finally, they consider the future of Java as a foundation for component-based software in heterogeneous environments and suggest architectural abstractions which will prove key to the successful development of such systems. They drive the discussion with examples and suggestions from their work on the Actor model of computation.

    @InProceedings{agha-hcw-98,
    author = "G. Agha and M. Astley and J. Sheikh and C. A. Varela",
    title = {{Modular Heterogeneous System Development: A Critical Analysis of Java}},
    editor = "J. Antonio",
    pages = "144-155",
    booktitle = "Proceedings of the Seventh Heterogeneous Computing Workshop (HCW '98)",
    year = 1998,
    publisher = "IEEE Computer Society",
    month = "March",
    ps = "http://web.archive.org/web/20010404065326/http://osl.cs.uiuc.edu/Papers/HCW98.ps",
    keywords = "distributed computing, internet programming languages, concurrent programming, coordination models",
    abstract = {Java supports heterogeneous applications by transforming a heterogeneous network of machines into a homogeneous network of Java virtual machines. This approach abstracts over many of the complications that arise from heterogeneity, providing a uniform API to all components of an application. However, for many applications heterogeneity is an intentional feature where components and resources are co-located for optimal performance. The authors argue that Java's API does not provide an effective means for building applications in such an environment. Specifically, they suggest improvements to Java's existing mechanisms for maintaining consistency (e.g. synchronized), and controlling resources (e.g. thread scheduling). They also consider the recent addition of a CORBA API in JDK 1.2. They argue that while such an approach provides greater flexibility for heterogeneous applications, many key problems still exist from an architectural standpoint. Finally, they consider the future of Java as a foundation for component-based software in heterogeneous environments and suggest architectural abstractions which will prove key to the successful development of such systems. They drive the discussion with examples and suggestions from their work on the Actor model of computation.} 
    }
    


Miscellaneous
  1. C. Varela. An Actor-Based Approach to World-Wide Computing. Object-Oriented Programming, Systems, Languages and Applications (OOPSLA 98), Doctoral Symposium, October 1998. Keyword(s): distributed computing, concurrent programming, grid computing, software agents.
    Abstract:
    We define several actor-based abstractions (casts, directors, messengers) to effectively harness the power of the World Wide Web as a global computing infrastructure. Groups of actors, or "casts", represent an abstraction unit for naming, synchronization, migration and load balancing. Each cast contains a "director" and inter-cast communication is performed via special actors named "messengers".

    @Misc{varela-oopsla-98,
    author = {C. Varela},
    title = {{An Actor-Based Approach to World-Wide Computing}},
    howpublished = {Object-Oriented Programming, Systems, Languages and Applications (OOPSLA 98), Doctoral Symposium},
    month = {October},
    year = 1998,
    url = {http://web.archive.org/web/20010404065326/http://osl.cs.uiuc.edu/~cvarela/oopsla98/},
    keywords = {distributed computing, concurrent programming, grid computing, software agents},
    abstract = {We define several actor-based abstractions (casts, directors, messengers) to effectively harness the power of the World Wide Web as a global computing infrastructure. Groups of actors, or "casts", represent an abstraction unit for naming, synchronization, migration and load balancing. Each cast contains a "director" and inter-cast communication is performed via special actors named "messengers".} 
    }
    



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Last modified: Tue Oct 13 12:16:53 2020
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